Monday, July 4, 2016

Blitz: books by Graham Bradley





Graham Bradley is a truck driver by trade, but has been writing since age eight, thanks to the encouragement of a childhood teacher, Mrs. Peplowski.

Likewise, his grandmother made him promise to "do something" with his knack for drawing, so he illustrates as well.

He is fluent in Spanish, and knows the proper method of ironing a dress shirt. Despite spending less than 6 hours of his entire life in Indianapolis, the Colts are his team.

He lives in Henderson, Nevada, with his wife and sons.

Connect with the Author here: 


REBEL HEART
In 1776, the American rebels were thwarted by British magic. The leaders were executed, but the surviving soldiers went into hiding and kept the revolution alive. By 1984 they have developed better weapons and machinery to even the odds. Now all these "technomancers" need is an army for their arsenal, and their newest recruit is 15 year-old Calvin Adler of Baltimore. The problem is, he’s got a pretty strong will, and might give the technomancers at bit of trouble in training...
SUICIDE RUN
Calvin learns that the technomancers aren't all good guys like he'd thought, and soon runs afoul of the worst of them. Now, with a bomb in his chest and a lot of ground to cover, he has a little over a week to save his life, or else become another casualty in the revolution. Meanwhile, an old enemy comes back stronger than ever, with ambition to spare...


PATRIOT'S GAME
Calvin is on the brink of death. The army is scattered, the commodore is dead, and the British mages know about the technomancers' secret weapon. Just as all hope seems lost, Calvin and his friends find out the mages have a weakness, one that could end the war overnight and liberate the colonials.
But it will take a miracle to reach it...






Top Ten List (part 1):

Books that had a big impact on me over the years. (This isn’t necessarily a “top” ten, but a list of ten books going all the way back to my childhood.) In no particular order:
OH, BROTHER by Johnniece Marshall Wilson. The same 3rd grade teacher that got me into writing also gave me this novel, which was about two brothers with jarringly different personalities who had to share a bedroom. I found a ton of parallels in it when I considered my relationship with my own older brother (it’s written from the POV of the younger brother.) I read it several times, just absorbing it over and over, and as I reflect on it, I’m glad my teacher knew me well enough to know what book would find a place in my being the way this one did.
UNWIND by Neal Shusterman. I could write pages and pages about this book. Let me just cite two things: first, Shusterman found a way to take a hot-button social issue (abortion) and write a story about it that examined a very, very scary solution to it…without revealing his own opinion on the matter. And second, there’s one particular scene in the book that made me put it down and just not say anything for a while. It kind of wrecked me, it was so powerfully written and well thought-out, and it jarred my soul. If you’ve read this book, you know which scene I’m talking about. Nobody could mistake it. I want to learn how to do what Shusterman did in this book.
EDUCATION OF A WANDERING MAN by Louis L’Amour. If I hadn’t taken one of my college English classes, I would never have read this. Louis L'Amour was a frontiersman and a writer. These two things, plus his own views and philosophies about life, history, the world, and his craft, made for an impactful combination, and I find myself wanting to emulate a lot of his attitudes and methods on things. His writing philosophies especially shaped my approach to historical fiction.
HARD MAGIC by Larry Correia. Oh, man. What a rip-roaring adventure. This was the book that taught me never to hold back, that you don’t have to have just one good idea in a story or a series or a world. If you want to have magical secret wizards using X-Men style powers with awesome guns on airships while they fight magical samurai in an alternate 1930s Prohibition-era America, then by golly, why would you not? Because if you write the dialogue and the narrative bits the way that you would write any other serious piece of fiction, all of the cool bits are just icing on the cake.

THE WITCHES by Roald Dahl. Another great book from my 3rd grade days. I read the cover off this thing almost. I can only say that about a few books in life, and most of them are on this list. 

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